hermione: hes a werewolf

ron: :O

harry: :O

lupin: how did u know

hermione: your name

hermione: it's werewolf

hermione: mcwerewolf

hermione:

hermione: i swear to shit im surrounded by dumb fucks

merryweatherblue:

I took my little brother (who falls on the autism spectrum) to see Guardians of the Galaxy and after this scene he lit up like a Christmas tree and screamed “He’s like me! He can’t do metaphors!” And for the rest of the film my brother stared at Drax in a state of rapture. 

So for the last 6 days I have heard my brother repeatedly quote all of the Drax lines from the movie verbatim (one of his talents), begin studying vocabulary test words, and tell everyone he knows that people with autism can also be superheroes.

Now I am not saying that Drax the Destroyer is, or was ever, intended to be autistic. All I am saying is that it warmed my heart to see my brother have an opportunity to identify himself with a character known for his strength, badassness, and honor. And that is pretty damn awesome. 

So while I adored Guardians of the Galaxy as a great fun loving film with cool characters I can do nothing but thank Marvel Studios and Dave Bautista for finally bringing a superhero to the screen that my little brother can relate to.

(via allthatishiddles)

hawkcyes:

Cool date idea: sit and listen to me dissect every scene in Captain America: The Winter Soldier. End the night with me crying in your lap.

(via claralily)

anime protagonist: i'll never give up! my friends are my power

anime antagonist: where they at doe

"We quickly located a firefighter costume for boys, complete with a bright red jacket, a traditional helmet and an axe. The girls’ version, on the other hand, is a skin-tight, short, shiny dress that’s surely flammable. It includes a fascinator (in lieu of a helmet) never before seen on a real firefighter.

The model on the package, who looks to be about the same age as my daughter, completes the outfit with heeled, calf-high boots — not ideal for running into burning buildings, or trick-or-treating for that matter. The costume is for children four to six and it’s one of several provocative costumes for the age group.

Even the pumpkin costume for preschoolers is sexy: it’s sleeveless and features a black bodice with an orange ribbon that laces up the front like a corset. I found the girls’ firefighter and the police officer costumes the most offensive, as they hung on the rack in stark contrast to the boys’ versions.

What kind of message do these costumes send to our girls? While the boys have costumes that look like the real thing, girls are expected to dress up in spoof ensembles, thus suggesting they can’t, or shouldn’t, do the real job. The costumes are not only “sexy,” they’re also sexist."
-

Halloween Costumes Are Sexualizing Our Youngest Trick-Or-Treaters

(via fucknosexistcostumes)

(via conversatingwithmyself)

arminarlert:

reminder that if we’re in a mutual and you’re under the age of 18 and find it creepy or weird that i’m following you back as an adult then let me know and i’ll unfollow and it won’t need to be a big deal at all… like, please put your own safety and wellbeing first 

(via eating-pie-in-the-tardis)

love-and-bdsm:

queeringfeministreality:

theawkwardlifeofapsycho:

Why is this not taught universally.

Sad that we have to teach that. Sigh.

In terms of self defense, the fingers are individually more vulnerable than the hand. If someone grabs you or is choking you, it is much easier to grab a finger than to pull their hand off, especially the pinkie or ring finger. And typically speaking, break a finger or two, they will likely pull their hand away and give you a moment to strike again.

(Source: sfgifs, via gallifreyan-ginger-sociopath)


http://archiveofourown.org/users/itsoriginal17